PDF/EPUB Annie Lowrey ↠ PDF/EPUB Give People Money: How a Universal Basic Income Would End ↠ cekhargaproduk.co

New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice Short listed for the 2018 FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award A brilliantly reported global look at universal basic income a stipend given to every citizen and why it might be necessary in an age of rising ineuality persistent poverty and dazzling technology Imagine if every month the government deposited 1000 into your bank account with nothing expected in return It sounds crazy But it has become one of the most influential and hotly debated policy ideas of our time Futurists radicals libertarians socialists union representatives feminists conservatives Bernie supporters development economists childcare workers welfare recipients and politicians from India to Finland to Canada to Mexico all are talking about UBI In this sparkling and provocative book economics writer Annie Lowrey examines the UBI movement from many angles She travels to Kenya to see how a UBI is lifting the poorest people on earth out of destitution India to see how inefficient government programs are failing the poor South Korea to interrogate UBI’s intellectual pedigree and Silicon Valley to meet the tech titans financing UBI pilots in expectation of a world with advanced artificial intelligence and little need for human labor Lowrey explores the potential of such a sweeping policy and the challenges the movement faces among them contradictory aims uncomfortable costs and most powerfully the entrenched belief that no one should get something for nothing In the end she shows how this arcane policy has the potential to solve some of our most intractable economic problems while offering a new vision of citizenship and a firmer foundation for our society in this age of turbulence and marvels New York Times Book Review Editors' ChoiceShort listed for the 2018 FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year AwardA brilliantly reported global look at universal basic income a stipend given to every citizen and why it might be necessary in an age of rising ineuality persistent poverty and dazzling technologyImagine if every month the government deposited 1000 into your bank account with nothing expected in return It sounds crazy But it has become one of the most influential and hotly debated policy ideas of our time Futurists radicals libertarians socialists union representatives feminists conservatives Bernie supporters development economists childcare workers welfare recipients and politicians from India to Finland to Canada to Mexico all are talking about UBIIn this sparkling and provocative book economics writer Annie Lowrey examines the UBI movement from many angles She travels to Kenya to see how a UBI is lifting the poorest people on earth out of destitution India to see how inefficient government programs are failing the poor South Korea to interrogate UBI’s intellectual pedigree and Silicon Valley to meet the tech titans financing UBI pilots in expectation of a world with advanced artificial intelligence and little need for human laborLowrey explores the potential of such a sweeping policy and the challenges the movement faces among them contradictory aims uncomfortable costs and most powerfully the entrenched belief that no one should get something for nothing In the end she shows how this arcane policy has the potential to solve some of our most intractable economic problems while offering a new vision of citizenship and a firmer foundation for our society in this age of turbulence and marvels New York Times Book Review Editors' ChoiceShort listed for the 2018 FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year AwardA brilliantly reported global look at universal basic income a stipend given to every citizen and why it might be necessary in an age of rising ineuality persistent poverty and dazzling technologyImagine if every month the government deposited 1000 into your bank account with nothing expected in return It sounds crazy But it has become one of the most influential and hotly debated policy ideas of our time Futurists radicals libertarians socialists union representatives feminists conservatives Bernie supporters development economists childcare workers welfare recipients and politicians from India to Finland to Canada to Mexico all are talking about UBIIn this sparkling and provocative book economics writer Annie Lowrey examines the UBI movement from many angles She travels to Kenya to see how a UBI is lifting the poorest people on earth out of destitution India to see how inefficient government programs are failing the poor South Korea to interrogate UBI’s intellectual pedigree and Silicon Valley to meet the tech titans financing UBI pilots in expectation of a world with advanced artificial intelligence and little need for human laborLowrey explores the potential of such a sweeping policy and the challenges the movement faces among them contradictory aims uncomfortable costs and most powerfully the entrenched belief that no one should get something for nothing In the end she shows how this arcane policy has the potential to solve some of our most intractable economic problems while offering a new vision of citizenship and a firmer foundation for our society in this age of turbulence and marvels


5 thoughts on “Give People Money: How a Universal Basic Income Would End Poverty, Revolutionize Work, and Remake the World

  1. says:

    Superficial at best and too sweeping without attention to the underlying economics and workings ofdifferent UBI systems and philosophies A missed opportunity for a serious and in depth study


  2. says:

    If everyone knew what this book reveals we would be on the way to a world that lifts up people at the bottom while making the rich even richer and everyone in between better off It works because money flows up much faster than it trickles down


  3. says:

    Loved this book


  4. says:

    There is already a democratic mayor in Stockton California experimenting with what is called a Universal Basic Income I hope that is the last democrat who promotes this novel idea unless we like losing the house the senate and the white house I'm a liberal and I'm all for discussing new ideas but if democratic politicians are stupid enough to talk about this on television or to utter the phrase Universal Basic Income then get ready to re elect Donald Trump in 2020 In a country that just passed a tax cut for millionaires in a country where 62 million Americans voted for Donald Trump in a country where citizens who didn't like Obamacare like the Affordable Care Act they are the same you are handing every future election to the Republicans who will crucify you with this concept Within minutes they will have several catchy phrases Universal Basic Welfare to label every democrat who makes an attempt to defend this economic idea So let this idea be debated on college campuses in economics departments and let other countries conduct their experiments and measure their results but please democrats don't go here If you allow this to become part of the national discussion on Fox News and other far right websites then you deserve to lose the next election because it won't take much to get 5% of the liberal population loving it and not voting for the main democratic candidate and another 8% of the population very concerned when they were polled about Universal Basic Welfare Medicare is not funded properly; Social Security is not funded properly; Health Care is strangling consumers and the economy The average voter will never believe we can give people money


  5. says:

    I certainly enjoyed reading the book and I definitely recommend that anyone interested in a UBI check it out However I found myself freuently shaking my head in disagreement with the author while reading the book even though I am optimistic about the possibilities of a UBI in the USThe biggest criticism I have is that Lowrey does not seriously tackle the nuts and bolts of how a UBI could be implemented in the US especially with regard to paying for it In fairness she does provide several policy ideas later in the book but she drastically diminishes the difficulties each would have to overcome to win support in the US A UBI in the US would be extremely expensive likely costing at a minimum 2 trillion per year above current expenditures and possibly much higher with a less optimistic estimate Yet after acknowledging the high costs Lowrey makes the following claim A 1000 a month UBI is possible and if correctly designed it would not help the poor at the expense of the middle class raise taxes obscenely or fail to end poverty However this sentence contradicts her discussion in the same chapter about the costs of a UBI where she points out how taxing the wealthiest individuals at 100% of their income still would not come close to paying for a UBI She proposes other various taxes such as a carbon tax or a tax on financial transactions and these taxes may indeed be viable proposals to help finance a UBI But the fact remains that a UBI would be a huge increase in costs for the US and ultimately it would likely reuire a huge increase in taxes on the rich and also an increase in taxes for segments of the middle class as well There is no such thing as a free lunch Yet as a Hail Mary the author suggests that if all else fails the US government could just print money because what could possibly go wrong? She states dollars are not something that the United States government can run out of This is where I really really found it difficult to take Lowrey seriously Surely she knows better than this The US government cannot just print 2 trillion or a year without any adverse conseuences Again TINSTAAFLSecond Lowrey never really resolves the issue of who should receive the UBI and whether it should replace other social programs to reduce costs Should it be given to everyone only the poor only women everyone excluding the upper class or who? And should the UBI replace existing social programs like social security medicare food stamps etc? In fairness the author tries to explore a lot of these possibilities but she seems to punt on the intellectual demanding task of actually arguing for one or the other Much like her discussion of how to pay for a UBI the author chooses to let someone else figure out answers to these uestions and I found myself with a big pile of unanswered uestionsThird the author is extremely optimistic about how poor people will spend their UBI She should have devoted much time to at least exploring the possibility that a large chunk of individuals would waste the money For instance if we get rid of Section 8 housing what do we do when a single mother receiving a UBI blows it all on something frivolous and can't pay the rent thus forcing her children to be homeless? Although I do agree with the author that poverty is often the result of uncontrollable factors I also believe that sometimes it is indeed the product of laziness and poor choices and a UBI will not fix this Any serious discussion of a UBI cannot just gloss over these potential negatives while assuming that all people will make wise choices if you just give them a bunch of money This is unrealisticLastly the book often struggles from a lack of focus as the author uickly discusses the implementation of UBI type programs in a variety of places without much analysis or concrete conclusions from the anecdotes There is little discussion of the stark differences in complexity of instituting a UBI in a place like Kenya as opposed to instituting a UBI in the USA The author also spends too much time giving us social justice history lessons and lectures which often seem irrelevant to the topic at hand At times the fiercely liberal slant of the author becomes obvious such as when she states that lower income families pay Uncle Sam a disproportionate burden of cigarette taxes and buying up most of the lottery tickets The irony of the neediest among us throwing their money away on lottery tickets is lost on the author given her rosy portrait of how lower income individuals would spend their UBI paymentsOn a positive note the book was very enjoyable to read as it allowed me to further develop my own unanswered uestions regarding the implementation of a UBI In spite of the above criticisms the author should get credit for writing such a thought provoking book on such a relevant topic I still find myself optimistic about the possibility of a UBI in the US and Lowrey has further piued my interest in the topic I look forward to reading much on UBI and hopefully finding answers to the serious uestions posed above